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Dreamers and Doers

I was driving home last night, and the sun was setting behind the trees, leaving them a black sillohette against a burning sky.  It happens almost every night, but last night, I thought to myself how fortunate we are to live here in this world, so full of magic and wonder all the time.

I know that I am particularly succeptible to this kind of imput, I am predisposed to seeing these things, I live my life mostly in my head, and in words and images; this is my business and my joy.  And it may be a form of mental illness, but my writer's brain narrates events even as they are happening to me, even as I experience the world in life, my head is filled with words.

I am exceptionally fortunate to live where I do, with the people I do, I am blessed with eyes that can see these things and blessed with a mind that can sometimes describe things so others can see them too, even if they see them differently than I do, and only in their head.

With the right kind of eyes, this world can be magic.

There are other kind of people, important, smart people, that are more focused are more driven by other things, that see importance in things that I do not, that are driven by careers and money and status in a way that I am not, and I don't want to give the impression that I am looking down on these people or lifting them up, either, they are just different than I am, they see value in things that I do not, discard things that I find important, and that is just fine. These people get things done, they can call customer service and be their own advocate in official situations.  They write letters and instigate discussions, they, in other words, get shit done.  I wish I had a lot of that myself really.  I wish I was more on top of things, I wish I remembered appointments, I wish running errands and calling the cable company didn't seem so insurmountable, I really do.

People are different, thats all.  People see the world differently, they value different things and that doesn't make me or them better than the other.  We all contribute, just differently.  Some people are doers and some people are dreamers, but we all bring good things to the world, don't we? When the PDA planner chimes lesiure time, and the doers need a break?  They pick up a book that a dreamer wrote, they listen to music that a dreamer made or watch a movie conceived by a creator.  These things would never be possible with out doers though; they publish our books, distrubute our music, finance our movies, they are patrons for our symphonies and our theatres.  They make life move along, we just make it worth moving along with.

I was driving home last night and the sun lit fire to the sky and I was filled with wonder and awe for the magical, musical world we live in and I felt truly blessed to have the eyes I do, to have the mind I do, I felt blessed to have a wonderful family in the car with me, blessed that my life is filled with love and joy.  I'm not rich, and I will never be great at calling the insurance company, but damn I wouldn't trade this for all the stock options in the world, I wouldnt trade this for a cleaner house or a more organized schedule.  Im a dreamer.

Consider: what are you seeing when you drive home from work today, when you step out of your front door, when you see strangers on the street walking their dogs?  What does the world look like to you?

Take a moment.  Dream with me.

Still Writing,

RP  9-18-15

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